A MUTUAL INTEREST

COMMUNITY FOR PERMANENT SUPPORTED HOUSING is seeking partnerships to increase the availability of affordable housing and our workshops for people with disabilities and their families.

The information on and the format of this page are the result of extensive research. This is for the expressed use of Businesses and Foundations interested in learning more about the mission of CPSH and protected by CPSH copyright.

Businesses

Have you considered using your influence to improve the lives of people with disabilities? You may be investing in or managing real estate. Or you may want to support your employees with disabilities or employees with a lifetime of responsibility for a loved one with a disability. Would you like COMMUNITY FOR PERMANENT SUPPORTED HOUSING to contact you? email

Foundations

Does your Foundation’s interest include reducing homelessness, increasing the stock of low income housing, community impact, disabilities or education? Would you like to learn more about COMMUNITY FOR PERMANENT SUPPORTED HOUSING. email

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PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES WHO LIVED IN SUPPORTIVE HOUSING AFTER RELEASE FROM JAIL OR PRISON WERE 61 PERCENT LESS LIKELY TO BE RE-INCARCERATED ONE YEAR LATER THAN THOSE NOT OFFERED SUPPORTIVE HOUSING
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The Dallas/Fort Worth Area

  • Most concentrated population of people with intellectual/developmental disabilities

  • About 200,000 adults have at least one intellectual/developmental disability (IDD) and have at least one independent living difficulty.

  • Enough beds will be available for less than 3% of this population when their primary caretaker is no longer able to care for them.

  • Caregivers (mostly parents) are aging. 20% are 60+ years old. 35% are 41-59 years old.

  • Prevalence of autism had risen to 1 in every 59 births in the United States

  • 90% of people with Down Syndrome will be affected by Alzheimer's disease by the age of 49.

  • Neighbors are not aware of the capabilities of people living with disabilities.

  • Many people with IDD can live independently with support service they already receive.