How Disability-Friendly is Your City?

"The city you live in can have an enormous impact on your quality of life – especially if you have a disability. From wheelchair accessible sidewalks to employment options to the weather itself, there are a variety of characteristics that can determine whether your hometown is a good place to live.

So how disability-friendly is your city?

This could depend on the kind of special needs you have. A lot of city features just might not be as important for you as others. State and local laws will also be a factor. As a minimum, the American with Disabilities Act requires that state and local governments make their programs and services easily accessible to people with disabilities. With that said, it doesn’t mean that all cities and states are alike. Some places may go out of their way to make themselves more appealing to people who happen to be disabled, while other cities might barely do what’s legally required of them. Whether you’re looking to move to a new city that’s great for a person with a handicap or you’re curious to see how accommodating your hometown is, this checklist will help you figure that out. We’ll cover the 77 features that can make your city or town disability-friendly."

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People with Disabilities Vote - California Video

Imagine what would happen if all the Texans with disabilities voted in the 2018 election.

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July 2018 Creating Home News (Archive)

Creating Home News
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Collin, Denton, Dallas, Ellis, Kaufman, Rockwall and Tarrant Counties

COMMUNITY FOR PERMANENT SUPPORTED HOUSING
July 2018

Summary of 6/23/18 Neighborhood Home Open House
  • Thank you for attending the open house. It was a full house to learn more about this "Neighborhood Home". This is not an HCS-residential home, though there are agencies identified to provide support for the residents. It's anticipated that residents will be moving in during July/August. Adults with special needs and their parents are interested in housing across North Texas. Thank you to Rosemary for opening the home.

    Because of the interest in Neighborhood Homes, in the next few weeks CPSH will working with families who are interested in dedicating a home for independent living in the next twelve months. CPSH will keep you updated through this newsletter. If you are currently creating a Neighborhood Home and would like CPSH to participate in an open house, please email CPSH
Neighborhood Homes and Mainstream Vouchers for People with Disabilities
  • CPSH will be working with interested home owners to access HUD vouchers, so the residences have access to decreased rent costs. In mid to late August we will know more about which DFW Housing Authorities have been awarded funding for Mainstream Vouchers. These Vouchers are designed to help tenants with disabilities live independently in the community. The Mainstream Vouchers are for non-elderly people with disabilities who are transitioning from institutional or other segregated settings to community living; at serious risk of institutionalization; homeless; or at risk of becoming homeless. This is affordable housing and would include services. Information about the progress of these applications will be posted in future CPSH emails.

    CPSH is compiling an interest list. CPSH is looking for the following:
    • People with disabilities interested in applying for these Mainstream Vouchers
    • Property owners of single family or multi family properties interested in tenants with Mainstream Vouchers.

    Self-advocates, and parents/guardians of a persons with a disability, and property owners please complete the Yellow Sheet.

    Service providers (medicaid or private) and interested in assisting tenants please complete the SP Form.

Announcing KeyReady Living
  • COMMUNITY FOR PERMANENT SUPPORTED HOUSING is delighted to announce our partnership with a firm in the Dallas/Fort Worth Area, KeyREADY Living.

    As we have heard from you, self-advocates with disabilities and their families, once a decision is made to invest in a signal family home, or rent space in an apartment, a home, duplex, or condo, you have real estate questions.

    KeyREADY Living is a real estate firm that can assist you in:
    • Investing or purchasing a home
    • Renting a home or apartment unit
    • Maintaining a property

    Kathy Retamozo Lipnick, owner, has a nephew with disabilities and provides real estate services to people with disabilities and their families.

    To see a video that explains Kathy's service and to download a brochure, go here.
What is Take Me Home?

Take Me Home is a database developed by the Pensacola Police Department for people who may need special assistance if they are alone or in times of emergency. This kind of assistance may be required if the person is unable to speak or properly identify themselves, or if they become disoriented or act in a manner that could be misinterpreted by first responders.
The system includes a current digital picture, demographic information and caregiver contacts. If a police officer encounters a person in the Take Me Home system, the officer can query the Take Me Home system, searching by name or by the person’s physical description. Once the individual’s Take Me Home record has been located, the officer has the information at hand to appropriately assist the person.

Take Me Home was developed in cooperation with Consolidated Technology Solutions, a law enforcement software company, and with the support of then-Pensacola Police Chief John Mathis. In conjunction with the Autism Society’s Safe and Sound Initiative, the Take Me Home program is distributed nationwide so that it may be available to all law enforcement agencies, free of charge.

How does it work?

Police departments make the commitment to use the program and gather and maintain the individual enrollment records. Once the program is in place in a community, families or individuals contact the police department and submit a recent digital photo, description of height, weight and other demographic information as well as emergency contact information.

This information is placed in a database that can be accessed in a police cruiser or back at the station. If officers find someone who can’t communicate where he/she lives, they can search the database by description and return the person to their loved ones. The system also works in reverse — if a loved one goes missing, their picture and description are immediately available.

Take Me Home is voluntary for citizens who participate, and all information is kept confidential.

There is no charge to police departments for the program and there is no enrollment fee.

Below are cities in the DFW area currently participating in the Take Me Home or a similar program, with links directly to the programs

  • ALLEN POLICE DEPT.
  • BEDFORD POLICE DEPT.
  • FORNEY POLICE DEPT.
  • FRISCO TEXAS POLICE DEPT.
  • JOHNSON COUNTY S.O.
  • KELLER
  • MCKINNEY POLICE DEPT.
  • PLANO TX P.D.
  • SOUTHLAKE


  • As parents encourage independence this program is an additional safety net for families. Signing up is another way to celebrate "Independence Day." It's also a gift for peace of mind. Here is a video.

    Find Housing
    • CPSH continues to work with community leaders to address the lack of safe, affordable, service-enriched, community-based housing in North Texas and will share progress with you through this newsletter. The most up-to-date information on where to find housing is on the Find Housing webpage.

    Learning opportunities - sign up on the interest lists. The session are sellouts!
    Creating Home News and Calendar <=== Check out more news!
    • Creating Home News and Calendar e-newsletter has stories, calendar of events, and other features about creative housing options for adults with intellectual/developmental disabilities or social challenges, as well as independent living in North Texas. Back issues of these emails are also included.
    CPSH Housing Survey
    Appreciate the Work CPSH Does?
    Please make plans to donate to CPSH on NTGD.

    CPSH can only succeed with your financial help.

    Learn more about donating at the CPSH 2018 NTGD Webpage.


    Thank you!

    Subscribe
    Facebook Twitter
    About CPSH
    CPSH is a charity and works with families and community partners to create more housing options in the Collin, Denton, Dallas, Ellis, Kaufman, Rockwall and Tarrant Counties for almost 100,000 adults with intellectual/developmental disabilities or social challenges regardless of IQ who need safe, affordable housing with support.

    8 Ways to Support CPSH, here.
    Watch the CPSH Animated Mission Video, here.
    Change your subscription or contact CPSH
    © by 2018 Community for Permanent Supported Housing. All rights Reserved.




    The Case for Improving Work for People with Disabilities Goes Way Beyond Compliance

    Laura Sherbin  and  Julia Taylor Kennedy    DECEMBER 27, 2017

    As Chieko Asakawa walks around IBM’s campus, she explores new ways of getting from point A to point B. She recognizes the faces of colleagues approaching her and greets them. She reads snack labels and decides whether to eat them. Although she is blind, Asakawa doesn’t need a human or canine companion to complete these tasks. She’s helped invent a smartphone app that, as she explained in a recent TED talk, “understands our surrounding world and whispers to me in voice or sends a vibration to my fingers. Eventually, I’ll be able to find a classroom on campus, enjoy window shopping, or find a nice restaurant while walking along a street.”

    Asakawa has been able to turn her disability into a professional asset, to the commercial benefit of her employers. But many people with disabilities enter workplaces that don’t enable them to do the same.

    A new study from the Center for Talent Innovation (CTI) found that, according to the 2015 US government’s definition of disability, a significant portion of the white-collar workforce has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits a major life activity: 30% of a nationally representative survey of 3,570 white-collar employees. The numbers are similar across gender, race, and generation. Not only do employees with disabilities comprise a large talent pool, it’s a remarkably innovative one: 75% of them report having an idea that would drive value for their company (versus 66% of employees without disabilities). Yet, we find, individuals with disabilities frequently encounter workplace discrimination, bias, exclusion, and career plateaus—meaning their employers lose out on enormous innovation and talent potential.

    Many people are surprised to learn that such a high rate of employees have disabilities, because they generally assume that “disability” means having an obvious physical condition. However, close to two-thirds of the study’s respondents have a disability which, while included under the federal definition, is invisible. These might include diseases like lupus or Crohn’s, whose flare-ups are incapacitating; migraines, which can cause temporary blindness; mood disorders like depression; learning disabilities like dyslexia; developmental differences like autism; and other forms of neurodiversity. Some 62% say that unless they deliberately disclose their disability, most people have no idea it exists.

    Counseled by family, friends, or even employment attorneys to keep silent for fear of discrimination, only 21% of employees with disabilities disclose to HR that they have one. And they’re right to be so hesitant. More than a third of survey respondents with disabilities say they have experienced negative bias while working at their current companies—and the more visible the disability, the more likely the bias. Whether intentionally or not, people exclude their colleagues with disabilities by misjudging them and underestimating their intelligence, insulting them, avoiding them, or making them feel uncomfortable by staring at them or refusing to meet their eyes.

    Employees with disabilities report strengths such as persistence, discipline, and willingness to commit, but feel employers don’t see this potential. Among the 75% of employees with disabilities who say they have market-worthy ideas, 48% say their ideas went ignored by people with the power to act on them, 57% feel stalled in their careers, and 47% feel they would never achieve a position of power at their company, no matter how high-performing or qualified they are. In interviews, we heard that individuals with disabilities face deep stigma and bias (whether conscious or not) from colleagues and managers. One millennial survey respondent confessed, “I’ve been here for six years without a promotion, even though my performance is excellent. I can’t prove that my cerebral palsy has played into that, but the fact is, you never see executives with physical disabilities in the industry.”

    But there are ways to remove the challenges faced by people with disabilities and open up innovative opportunities. Our research shows that the same inclusive leadership behaviorsthat leverage diversity to drive innovation and market growth can enable managers to support individuals with disabilities. These behaviors include ensuring that everyone on a team gets heard, giving actionable feedback, empowering team members to make decisions, and making it safe to propose novel ideas. Employees with disabilities who have inclusive team leaders are 36% less likely to face bias (compared to those without such managers), 14% less likely to repress themselves at work, and 32% less likely to feel stalled in their careers. And they are more likely to have their ideas endorsed.

    But teaching managers to display inclusive leadership behaviors is just the first step. Companies also need to create a culture of support and inclusion by doing the following:

    • Provide training. Many new employees with disabilities need support to get up to speed, but their colleagues and managers may not know how to help them—or have the patience to do it. Companies should put systems in place to help not only individuals with disabilities, but their managers and peers as well. In its strategy to help employees with disabilities build long-term careers, Unilever partnered with Connecticut’s Department of Rehabilitation Services and Southeastern Employment Services to launch a training and placement program. The program provides training for customer service analysts and regional distribution coordinators—two entry-level positions with frequent openings — as well as disability sensitivity training to existing employees to help them best support colleagues with disabilities. The goal is to train 20 to 30 employees with disabilities annually with a 50% conversion rate to full-time positions.
    • Offer leadership development opportunities to employees with disabilities.Unconscious bias can cause managers to overlook people with disabilities for leadership programs. To combat this, managers can create development options specifically targeted toward these individuals—and include them in opportunities that already exist and are open to different talent cohorts. For example, Abilities in Motion, KPMG’s employee resource group for employees with disabilities and those with family members who have disabilities, launched an initiative two years ago to give the firm’s employees with disabilities an opportunity to hone their leadership skills. The initiative connects aspiring leaders with disabilities to senior leaders within the firm who offer advice and counsel. These individuals also attend KPMG’s “Inspiring Change, Influencing Inclusion” leadership development conference, where they participate in workshops and panels with senior leaders with a focus on building executive presence and leadership skills.
    • Provide role models. A prominent executive with a disability makes it easier for others with disabilities to see themselves in leadership positions at their companies. For those who don’t have or have had less experience with people with disabilities, such role models help shape their perceptions and assumptions about what a leader looks like. Mark Bertolini, chair and CEO of Aetna, had a ski accident that severely damaged his spinal cord. After the accident, he insisted on returning to work, using a special chair to support his neck, a one-handed keyboard, a couch for rest when needed, and other accommodations. He continues to speak openly about the ongoing chronic pain caused by the accident to act as a role model and show others what’s possible.
    • Create allies in the organization. Encourage employees to speak up and show their sympathy especially colleagues who are familiar with the challenges faced by people with disabilities either through personal relationships or caregiving. Shaun Kelly, global chief operating officer of KPMG International, makes a point of speaking publicly about being a caregiver to his daughter, who has Down Syndrome: “The stigma seems to go away because there’s somebody in a leadership role who is comfortable talking about it.”

    For too long, companies have viewed employees with disabilities through the lens of compliance and accommodation. There’s no better time to start to look at disability through a different lens: of inclusion and infinite possibility.





    Inside Sinéad Burke's Inclusive Fashion Movement

    The BoF Podcast: Inside Sinéad Burke's Inclusive Fashion Movement

    Image: Tim Walker for BoF By BoF Team May 4, 2018 22:04 "Fashion has been an industry that I've long felt excluded from, despite being incredibly passionate about its transformational opportunity and ability to really change people and conversations and culture," Sinéad Burke, the three-and-a-half-foot activist, tells Imran Amed.





    May 2018 Creating Home News (Archive)

    Creating Home News
    wordart
    Collin, Denton, Dallas, Ellis, Kaufman, Rockwall and Tarrant Counties

    COMMUNITY FOR PERMANENT SUPPORTED HOUSING
    May 2018

    New to CPSH?
    • Welcome! CPSH is delighted you have join thousands of people who are interested in creating more safe, affordable, service enriched housing in neighborhoods across the DFW area. Please share your story .
    h
    Find Housing
    • CPSH continues to work with community leaders to address the lack of safe, affordable, service-enriched, community-based housing in North Texas and will share progress with you through this newsletter. The most up-to-date information on where to find housing is on the Find Housing webpage.

    Mainstream Vouchers for People with Disabilities
    • Several DFW Housing Authorities are looking at opportunities to apply for Mainstream Vouchers. These Vouchers are designed to help tenants with disabilities live independently in the community. The Mainstream Vouchers are for non-elderly people with disabilities who are transitioning from institutional or other segregated settings to community living; at serious risk of institutionalization; homeless; or at risk of becoming homeless. This is affordable housing and would include services.

      CPSH is compiling an interest list. CPSH is looking for the following:
      • People with disabilities interested in applying for these Mainstream Vouchers
      • Property owners of single family or multi family properties interested in tenants with Mainstream Vouchers.

      Self-advocates, and parents/guardians of a persons with a disability, and property owners please complete the Yellow Sheet.

      Service providers (medicaid or private) and interested in assisting tenants please complete the SP Form.
    h
    Learning opportunities - sign up on the interest lists
    Help Other Self-advocates and Families Find Services and Housing
    • Please complete the form here and share your favorites. There are families in immediate need of this information.

      CPSH looking for self-advocate and family recommendations for the following:
      • Favorite HCS Residential Home
      • Favorite Foster Parent who provide housing for people who aren't their family members
      • Favorite In-Home Caregiver
      • Favorite Medicaid Waiver/Private Pay Service Coordinator
      • Favorite Day Program
      • Favorite Behavior Specialist
      • Favorite Medical Doctor for people with disabilities

    • CPSH is adding this information to the Find Housing page on the CPSH Website.

    Creating Home News and Calendar <=== Check out more news!
    • Creating Home News and Calendar e-newsletter has stories, calendar of events, and other features about creative housing options for adults with intellectual/developmental disabilities or social challenges, as well as independent living in North Texas. Back issues of these emails are also included.
    CPSH Housing Survey
    Appreciate the Work CPSH Does?
    Please Donate!
    Help CPSH with 2018 Projects.

    CPSH can only succeed with your help.
    Learn more about donating at Give2CPSH.
    Thank you!

    Subscribe
    Facebook Twitter
    About CPSH
    CPSH is a charity and works with families and community partners to create more housing options in the Collin, Denton, Dallas, Ellis, Kaufman, Rockwall and Tarrant Counties for almost 100,000 adults with intellectual/developmental disabilities or social challenges regardless of IQ who need safe, affordable housing with support. CPSH has created an independent living guide for parents everywhere in Texas.


    8 Ways to Support CPSH, here.
    Watch the CPSH Animated Mission Video, here.
    Change your subscription or contact CPSH
    © by 2018 Community for Permanent Supported Housing. All rights Reserved.




    Aussie mum who tried to kill son with disability breaks silence

    Aussie mum who tried to kill son with disability breaks silence

    In an exclusive interview with 60 Minutes reporter Liz Hayes, set to air this Sunday, a Melbourne woman charged over the attempted murder of her son blames the disability support system for her harrowing behaviour. After spending more than three decades caring for her autistic and epileptic son, in May last year that Yvette Nichol finally "reached breaking point" and attempted to end his life.





    City of Plano Fair Housing Symposium - Handouts

    Materials include:

    •  THE 1968 FAIR HOUSING ACT & ASSESSING FAIR HOUSING IN YOUR COMMUNITY

    • Fair Housing Presentation

    • Texas Landlord-Tenant Law

    Link to handouts





    Section 8 Vouchers Help The Poor...

    Section 8 Vouchers Help The Poor - But Only If Housing Is Available

    Farryn Giles and her 6-year-old son Isaiah have been living in a crumbling apartment building with her ex-husband, who's letting her stay for a couple months. Pigeons have infested the walls of the courtyard. Before she lived here, she was sleeping on and off in her car.





    When the only hope is to outlive a child

    By JACQUIELYNN FLOYD Special to The Eagle

    Apr 16, 2018

    To most of us, it’s unthinkable that a loving parent might wish — might pray — to outlive a cherished son or daughter.

    It’s horrifying to imagine a parent making sure of it by murdering that child.

    No motive has been made clear, and none may ever be, to explain why a former Lucas City Council member strangled his disabled adult daughter last week before taking his own life.

    But the tragedy fits a pattern familiar to aging parents who have devoted their lives to caring for a profoundly disabled child — and who view the future with growing fear.

    “They all say the same thing: They hope their child will die before them,” said Laura Warren, executive director of Texas Parent to Parent, a nonprofit that advocates for families with disabled kids of all ages. “That’s just not realistic.”

    On April 8, 58-year-old Donald Zriny strangled his 26-year-old daughter, Amanda, and then hanged himself in the family’s semi-rural Collin County home.

    Acquaintances say Zriny, who served on the Lucas City Council — Lucas is just northeast of Plano — from 2005 to 2012, was the main caretaker for Amanda, who was born with severe disabilities. She was unable to walk, speak, read or write, and was entirely dependent on her parents, according to court records.

    Zriny’s wife, Amanda’s mother, discovered the bodies and frantically called police. She has since declined to comment; a woman who answered the phone at the family residence hung up when I called.

    What could you say about such a nightmare? That no one possibly can understand? That fear and despair can push a decent and loving person over a cliff?

    “It probably happens more than you think,” said Parent to Parent’s Warren, herself the mother of an adult son with disabilities.

    Decades after the routine practice of permanent institutionalization for developmentally and intellectually disabled children first was challenged and then largely phased out, we still do a piecemeal job providing services to kids with disabilities.

    But some parents are distraught to find that those piecemeal services get much more scarce when those children “age out” of the state mandate to provide educational services — usually at 18 or 21, Warren said.

    “It’s like falling into a black hole,” Warren said. “(Your child) leaves high school, you’re in a world that doesn’t make sense. The services and the help are gone.”

    The group Warren heads works to make connections between families of disabled children, decreasing the isolation they too often experience.

    There are other services available, but they can be scarce and hard to find. And the waiting lists can last for years.

    “Texas has to be one of the worst states for public funding for this,” Warren said. Surprise.

    But there are tragedies borne of private desperation elsewhere, too. One prominent case involved a Chicago-area woman named Bonnie Liltz who killed her severely disabled 28-year-old daughter, Courtney, in 2015.

    Frightened that her own recurring cancer would leave her unable to care for her daughter, Liltz killed Courtney with a lethal overdose of medication through her feeding tube. The two had lived alone for years in a small apartment, where they slept on twin beds in the same room so Liltz could always be at her daughter’s side.

    A judge sentenced Liltz to four years in prison, even though prosecutors themselves recommended probation. Last year, while free pending an appeal, Liltz took her own life.

    “(F)ar too many families with a member with a disability are not prepared for the future, or are frightened by what the future may look like,” wrote Peter Berns, CEO of Arc of the United States, an advocacy group for Americans with intellectual challenges.

     

    That fear, that relentless anxiety, is reflected in online message boards for families of disabled adults: “We worry about the future.” “I don’t know what I’m going to do.” “My parents have done nothing to set things up for my brother’s care.”

    We all want to believe that in this more enlightened post-institutional era, developmentally and intellectually disabled Americans are contented and accepted members of their own communities.

    We want to think that with a quick internet search or a phone call, the support services they and their families need can be accessed easily.

    Usually, that is a fantasy. Families describe full-time struggles with government agencies, a chronic lack of respite care, scarce availability of in-care assistance.

    “The need for competent help is daunting,” said the Philadelphia Inquirer in a compelling series on this issue published late last year.

    In Florida, where a large elderly population means more aging caretakers, families are desperate: “We hear again and again, ‘I am in my 80s and (the child) is in their 60s,” said Rich LaBelle, a family advocate. They only solution they see, he said, is this: “‘All I can hope is they pass away before I do.’”

    Think about it: These are parents who have provided decades of daily care for children who will never be able to live on their own. And the best they can hope for is to outlive those children, to see them die.

    If that’s the best hope they have, then shame on us all.

    Jacquielynn Floyd writes for The Dallas Morning News.





    April 2018 Creating Home News (Archive)

    Title of the document
    Creating Home News
    wordart
    Collin, Denton, Dallas, Ellis, Kaufman, Rockwall and Tarrant Counties

    COMMUNITY FOR PERMANENT SUPPORTED HOUSING
    April 2018

    April, 2018 CPSH Near You
    • Throughout April CPSH will be at many events across the DFW area. We invite you to stop by our table and find out more about what we are doing this year to assist people with disabilities and their families access safe, affordable housing. The events are posted on the CPSH Calendar.
    h
    Find Housing
    • Over the last three months CPSH has received increases in phone calls and emails from self-advocates and families of people with disabilities who need housing. CPSH continues to work with community leaders to address this issue and will share progress with you through this newsletter. The most up-to-date information on where to find housing is on the Find Housing webpage.

    City of Dallas Launches Annual Budget Survey
    • If you live in the City of Dallas, you may want to participate in the Annual Budget Survey. It allows Dallas residents to let their respective councilperson know how they would want their 2018-2019 tax dollars spent and on what programs. For example you can request the City to allocate more resources toward housing programs for adults with IDD. More information about the Survey.
    h
    Project Independence Workshops
    • Earlier this year CPSH held Project Independence Workshops for almost 40 families. These workshops are followed up with meet ups where self-advocates and families discuss how to create independence. To learn more about the workshops and sign up on the interest list for future workshops go to the Project Independence webpage.

    Help Other Self-advocates and Families Find Services and Housing
    • Recently, COMMUNITY FOR PERMANENT SUPPORTED HOUSING has received several phone call and emails requesting referrals to assist adults with special needs to find safe, affordable housing with attendants and service providers that are attentive to the needs of the individual. Most of the calls are from siblings or distance relatives or people moving to the DFW area who are accepting responsibility to ensure their loved ones are well taken care of.

      CPSH looking for self-advocate and family recommendations for the following:
      • Favorite HCS Residential Home
      • Favorite Foster Parent who provide housing for people who aren't their family members
      • Favorite In-Home Caregiver
      • Favorite Medicaid Waiver/Private Pay Service Coordinator
      • Favorite Day Program
      • Favorite Behavior Specialist
      • Favorite Medical Doctor for people with disabilities

    • Please complete the form here and share your favorites as soon as possible. There are families in immediate need of this information.

      CPSH is adding this information to the Find Housing page on the CPSH Website.

      Thank you for assisting those who have similar needs as you and your family.

      -************>




      Guardianship … and how to avoid it

      Thank you to Angela Biggs for sending CPSH this information.  

      Please be sure to consult your attorney if you have any questions.





      The Gap: A Shortage of Affordable Rental Homes

      No State Has an Adequate Supply of Affordable Rental Housing for the Lowest Income Renters

      Read the 2017 report





      February 2018 Creating Home News (Archive)

      Creating Home News
      wordart
      Collin, Denton, Dallas, Ellis, Kaufman, Rockwall and Tarrant Counties

      COMMUNITY FOR PERMANENT SUPPORTED HOUSING
      February 2018

      2/24/17 - Project Independent Workshop - Seats Available
      Hurst-Euless-Bedford Location
      
      UHC In partnership with UnitedHealthcare, CPSH is pleased to announce the the February 24, 2018 Project Independence Workshop.
      

      The Project Independence Workshop takes families through the 5 steps of how to create independent living in the community with friends. The instructor and parents who have successfully used this approach will share information. Participants will plan how to transition their children to more independence. Families of any age children are welcome to attend.

      Saturday, February 24, 2018 from 10:00am – 3:00pm
      6 Stones
      209 N Industrial Blvd #241
      Bedford, TX 76021
      Community Room

      There is a $10/person registration fee. The fee will be returned at completion of workshop. Space is limited.

      Watch the video testimony from a parent participant, details about the workshop, and RSVP here.

      Update: Information and list of North Texas Regional Fair Housing Assessment Meetings here.

      Creating Home News and Calendar here. <=== Check out more news!

      CPSH Housing survey here.
      Give $10
      Your Donation Matters!
      Help CPSH with 2018 Projects.

      CPSH can only succeed with your help. If you appreciate the importance of what we are doing in the DFW area, please consider donating to CPSH and ask your employer to match the donation.

      Learn more about donating at Give2CPSH.

      Thank you!

      Subscribe
      Facebook Twitter
      About This Newsletter
      The Community for Permanent Supported Housing e-newsletter has stories, calendar of events, and other features about creative housing options for adults with intellectual/developmental disabilities or social challenges, as well as independent living in North Texas.
      About CPSH
      CPSH is a charity and works with families and community partners to create more housing options in the Collin, Denton, Dallas, Ellis, Kaufman, Rockwall and Tarrant Counties for almost 100,000 adults with intellectual/developmental disabilities or social challenges regardless of IQ who need safe, affordable housing with support. CPSH has created an independent living guide for parents everywhere in Texas.


      8 Ways to Support CPSH, here.
      Watch the CPSH Animated Mission Video, here.
      Change your subscription or contact CPSH
      © by 2018 Community for Permanent Supported Housing. All rights Reserved.




      Small Area Fair Market Rent

      The fair market rent (FMR) is used as a guideline by public housing authorities (PHA) and other administrators when determining the maximum voucher payment (known as the payment standard) in the Housing Choice Voucher (HCV) program.

      Beginning with FY2018 HUD will begin requiring designated areas to use Small Area Fair Market Rent..  With the SAFMRs, HUD is attempting to help create actual incentives for tenants to move out of lower opportunity areas. Unlike the 50th percentile FMRs, the SAFMRs will be based on the actual rent of each zip code.

      More information can be found here.

      In the DFW area the value of the vouchers, established by SAFMR is below competitive rental rates in many areas.  This gap is one reason why some property owners won't accept vouchers. CPSH is working with leaders in the community encourage support of rent studies of local zip codes to show HUD our area needs significant increases in SAFMR.  For more information about this project, go here.

       

       

      "The use of Small Area FMRs is expected to give [Housing Credit Voucher] tenants access to areas of high opportunity and lower poverty areas by providing a subsidy that is adequate to cover rents in those areas, thereby reducing the number of voucher families that reside in areas of high poverty concentration," said HUD in November 2017.

      North Texas Regional Fair Housing Assessment Meetings

      North Texas Cities and Housing Authorities have planned follow up public input meetings for the North Texas Regional Assessment of Fair Housing (AFH). The purpose of the AFH is to assess whether individuals and families have the information, opportunity and options to live where they choose without unlawful discrimination related to race, color, religion, sex, familial status, national origin or disability.

      The AFH also assesses whether housing options are realistically available to people of varying backgrounds in integrated areas with access to opportunity. Input from advocates and the public was gathered during the first round of meetings and focus groups. They have used that input, along with local data, to formulate goals and strategies to address the fair housing issues that were found. These goals and strategies will be presented at this meeting, and all members of the public, advocates and members of protected classes are encouraged to attend and give their feedback.

      COMMUNITY FOR PERMANENT SUPPORTED HOUSING encourages you to attend one of these meetings to ensure your voice is heard.

      The meeting times and locations are posted here: http://northtexasrha.com/public-meetings/

      There is also a short online survey. Here is the link, http://northtexasrha.com/survey/.

      Background

      In 2017, COMMUNITY FOR PERMANENT SUPPORTED HOUSING joined the North Texas Regional Housing Assessment Team to conduct two Focus Groups to find out what types of housing individuals with disabilities want. Their parents also participated in these discussions. Here is a 3 minute video that explains the effort.



      Click on the image above to watch the video.


    This year, COMMUNITY FOR PERMANENT SUPPORTED HOUSING will continue to address affordable housing for citizens with disabilities in community-based, safe, neighborhoods. Services to live independently and community amenities are also necessary so that these citizens are able to work and socialize in the communities they are familiar with.

    CPSH welcomes your collaboration on moving this mission forward. Please contact me if you'd like to discuss working together or have questions about our work.