Oct/Nov 2017 Creating Home News (Archive)

Creating Home News
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Collin, Denton, Dallas, Ellis, Kaufman, Rockwall and Tarrant Counties

COMMUNITY FOR PERMANENT SUPPORTED HOUSING
October/November 2017

CPSH Update

On Thursday, October 26, 2017, CPSH had the opportunity to update the Texas IDD System Redesign Committee on the status of housing for people with IDD and coordinating support services in North Texas. The testimony included the current status of the demands CPSH has made to the Dallas Housing Authority and Housing and Urban Development regarding discrimination against people with IDD who want to live in homes that have project-based vouchers and are owned by family members. CPSH is represented by Relman, Dane & Colfax PLLC in Washington, D.C. Among the firm's specialties are housing and civil rights.

CPSH has also asked the Committee for assistance in improving support services for people living independently. The video testimony including Q&A from the Committee is here.

Here are the key points offered in the testimony.

CPSH Demands of DHA

  1. Make awards from the current pool of applicants
  2. Establish a clear reasonable accommodation procedure
  3. Accept requests for reasonable accommodations from potential residents of any project-based housing funded through DHA
  4. Adopt a policy that clarifies that participation in an LLC or Special Needs Trust is not considered to be family ownership
  5. Continue offering RFPs on a rolling basis
  6. Pay appropriate damages and attorneys’ fees

CPSH Demands of HUD

  1. Withdraw its objections to the DHA’s RFP in writing
  2. Withdraw its instructions to DHA to request a regulatory waiver to proceed with the RFP
  3. Adopt clear instructions at the national level to correct its apparent misunderstanding of the requirements of the PB voucher rule and permit applications from persons who may appear to be a potential owner with a relationship to a person with a disability for project based voucher funds
  4. Provide training to all employees of the Office of Public and Indian Housing nationally to correct HUD’s improper actions here
  5. Pay appropriate damages and attorneys’ fees
We are hopeful that HUD will decide to make this right on a voluntary basis.

CPSH asks the IDD System Redesign Committee for the following:

  • Set expectation that Medicaid Waiver in home services go with a person living in a community-based home; not just ICF or "Group Home."
  • Increase training on Consumer Directed Services; include success stories of affording rent and services.
  • Ensure sufficient transportation funding is part of DADs budget. LIDDA participation in regional transportation planning.
  • Create state-wide resume bank for consumer access caregivers (including internships).
  • Bring mixed-income, mixed use developments or renovations with 15% Project-Based Vouchers to DFW.
  • Ensure parents sign students up on Medicaid Interest list at first ARD.
  • Ongoing independent living skill and behavior assessment each year as part of IEP. Home training/services if necessary.
  • Ensure independent living is part of student transition planning by age 14.
  • Identify homeless with IDD.
  • Train local first responders to communicate appropriately with people with IDD. Assess before arrest.
It was decided at the Committee meeting that CPSH will work with the System Adequacy Subcommittee to address these topics.

QUESTION OF THE MONTH
How have you used Community First Choice (CFC)?


Would you please send us your feedback, here?

Answers to past month's question about Camps are here.


Have you responded to the New CPSH Survey?
Your response helps CPSH plan for the next 5 years. The survey is here.

Creating Home News and Calendar here


48 pages, Full color, Bound, English, Spanish.
Find out about the guide, here.

Read feedback and order the guide, here. Please share your feedback.

Just $6 per copy!

School Districts, Businesses and Organizations, contact
CPSH about volume printing, here.

Your Donation Matters!
Help CPSH with 2017 Projects.

CPSH can only succeed with your help. If you appreciate the importance of what we are doing in the DFW area, please consider donating to CPSH and ask your employer to match the donation.

Learn more about donating at Give2CPSH.

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About This Newsletter
The Community for Permanent Supported Housing e-newsletter has stories, calendar of events, and other features about creative housing options for adults with intellectual/developmental disabilities or social challenges, as well as independent living in North Texas.

About CPSH
CPSH is a charity and works with families and community partners to create more housing options in the Collin, Denton, Dallas, Ellis, Kaufman, Rockwall and Tarrant Counties for almost 100,000 adults with intellectual/developmental disabilities or social challenges regardless of IQ who need safe, affordable housing with support. CPSH has created an independent living guide for parents everywhere in Texas.


8 Ways to Support CPSH, here.
Watch the CPSH Animated Mission Video, here.
Change your subscription or contact CPSH
© by 2017 Community for Permanent Supported Housing. All rights Reserved.

September, 2017 Creating Home News (Archive)

Title of the document
Creating Home News
wordart
Collin, Denton, Dallas, Ellis, Kaufman, Rockwall and Tarrant Counties

COMMUNITY FOR PERMANENT SUPPORTED HOUSING
September 2017

Seeking Male Adults to Share Plano Home

A neighborhood home in Plano, Tx has been established for male adults with autism or male adults (with disabilities) who feel comfortable living with people with autism. The current resident has behaviors where he makes noise.
  • Care plan for each person
  • Activities to be busy every day
  • Home case manager works with service providers/care givers of tenants (if funded)
  • Transition speed from current home to this home based on individual.
  • Individual bedrooms
  • Camera in main area for parents to check in occasionally
  • On a bus line
  • Rent: $750/month includes Home case management, rent and utilities
  • Contact: Judy, home case manager 760-419-5224

QUESTION OF THE MONTH
How was camp for your child with IDD or autism?


Would you please send us your feedback, here?

Answers to past month's question about Tiny Homes are here.


Have you responded to the New CPSH Survey?
Your response helps CPSH plan for the next 5 years. The survey is here.

Creating Home News and Calendar here


48 pages, Full color, Bound, English, Spanish.
Find out about the guide, here.

Read feedback and order the guide, here. Please share your feedback.

Just $6 per copy!

School Districts, Businesses and Organizations, contact
CPSH about volume printing, here.

Please donate to CPSH on Thursday, 9.14.17 - North Texas Giving Day
CPSH programs are designed to make a difference in your life. As we feel the impact of decreases to social services funding and the rapid population growth in our area, we must stay the course — advocating that the ones we love and care about have permanent homes to call their own when the time is right.

Donations Multiplied
Donations of $25 or more will be multiplied so your donation will go even farther!

Donations Doubled
National Mortgage Insurance is matching up to $3,000 to new donors who donate $25 or more to CPSH.
Anonymous Donors are matching up to $2,000 to returning donors who donate $100 or more to CPSH.

ntgd
Click on the image for more information and video.


Subscribe
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About CPSH
CPSH is a charity and works with families and community partners to create more housing options in the Collin, Denton, Dallas, Ellis, Kaufman, Rockwall and Tarrant Counties for almost 100,000 adults with intellectual/developmental disabilities or social challenges regardless of IQ who need safe, affordable housing with support. CPSH has created an independent living guide for parents everywhere in Texas.


cpsh

8 Ways to Support CPSH, here.
Watch the CPSH Animated Mission Video, here.
Change your subscription or contact CPSH
© by 2017 Community for Permanent Supported Housing.
All rights Reserved.
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The U.S. justice system has an autism problem... Dallas Morning News

To prevent people with autism and other disabilities from incarceration, CPSH is working on safe, affordable, housing with supports, programs to help families transition their children to independent living and first responder education. Join CPSH.  Support CPSH.





Churches have a history of excluding and erasing people with disabilities

By Shannon Dingle, Washington Post

August 5, 2017

"So, parents of kids with disabilities in the church, what do you wish good church people knew?" Preston Yancey tweeted in April.

With the responses, the hashtag #disabilityinchurch was born. As the conversation evolved, people with disabilities chimed in, recentering the discussion on their own experiences. Many people noticed, retweeted and shared how moved they were by the contributions.

I wasn't surprised that the conversation was driven by parents of children with disabilities, not people with disabilities themselves. I wasn't surprised that story after story revealed how little church leaders think about disability in their planning. I wasn't surprised to see the depths of pain displayed in 140 characters over and over again.

As justice conversations are gaining steam, we talk a lot about race. Immigration is discussed often, too, especially the question of refugees. Religious liberty for Muslims comes up, as we know threats to freedom for one faith can affect all faiths. Misogyny is a topic we'll tackle, and LGBT discrimination might be discussed.

But disability? We don't usually consider that a justice issue. We the disabled are marginalized even by those who consider themselves champions for those on the margins. I live with physical disabilities as the result of childhood abuse and a chronic degenerative joint disease. I have a son with autism, a daughter with ADHD and a daughter with cerebral palsy. I look for handicap accessibility since I walk with a limp and one child uses a motorized wheelchair.

Our history of exclusion and erasure of people with disabilities in the church goes back to Biblical times. In Old Testament law, priests with any disfigurement were forbidden from presenting offerings in the temple. In John 9, we hear the disciples express the early church thinking that disability must be the result of personal or ancestral sin.

On the other hand, St. Thomas Aquinas's writings offer recommendations for the inclusion of people with intellectual disabilities in the church, from baptism and communion to presence in general. However, U.S. churches haven't prioritized inclusion efforts until recently. Historically, U.S.-based Catholic and Protestant groups have built hospitals for those deemed crippled but haven't made space for us in their places of worship.

Martin Luther, who showed compassion for people with disabilities, once suggested that a specific child with significant disabilities be drowned because he wasn't fit to live - then a common theological response, according to Brett Webb-Mitchell's "Unexpected Guests at God's Banquet."

Similarly, the church has offered mixed messages about the worth and personhood of those living with disabling diagnoses. We have demonized the disabled by blaming them for their conditions, deified the disabled by treating life with suffering as akin to Christ's life, devalued our shared humanity in declaring the disabled to be in need of charity but not community and of dependence but not dignity, and denied the disabled by refusing to provide access to religious life.

Our family saw this play out in a small way on our last Sunday at a prominent Southern Baptist church in Raleigh, N.C., we left a year ago. That night, the preschool class sang as part of the opening worship time. For our youngest child to participate with her classmates, my husband and a friend had to lift her in her wheelchair onto the worship stage because no ramp existed to allow entry otherwise.

Why aren't ramps required there, like they are in other public venues? Because Christian schools and churches successfully fought to be excluded from the requirements of the Americans With Disabilities Act, which was passed 27 years ago.

This history is why I wasn't surprised by the stories of #disabilityinchurch, why I wasn't surprised when then-candidate Donald Trump's mocking of a disabled reporter didn't end his campaign and why I haven't been surprised recently as legislative health-care efforts moved forward even as disabled people spoke of the detrimental effects on their lives.

The advocacy organization ADAPT, which fights for people who are disabled, led the charge toward passing the disabilities act, positioned in opposition to the church in its stand for people with disabilities, so it doesn't surprise me that the church is largely silent again as ADAPT has been the most vocal opponent of the replacement and repeal of the Affordable Care Act.

The disabilities act set the stage for our exclusion, for people with disabilities less likely to attend services, Bible studies or other church activities. One-third of those parents say they've left at least one church because their child wasn't welcomed, according to a 2013 article by Elizabeth O'Hanlon in the Journal of Religion, Disability & Health.

The churches with the largest and best-established inclusive ministries for children - like McLean Bible Church in Virginia and Stonebriar Community Church in Frisco, Texas - are led by pastors who have children or grandchildren with significant disabilities. They didn't know the need; they knew the person. They didn't care about special needs; they cared about a person with special needs.

Many people with disabilities were begging fellow Americans to join with them in understanding and advocating for health care. I've been among those sharing my heart and my story, performing my pain in hopes that I finally will be seen clearly enough for others to care about my well-being. But unless you love me or someone like me who lives with disability, then these stories will be only stories.

Our justice was never meant to be an afterthought. In her book "Roadmap to Reconciliation," Brenda Salter McNeil writes, "Reconciliation is an ongoing spiritual process involving forgiveness, repentance and justice that restores broken relationships and systems to reflect God's original intention for all creation to flourish."

Her context of writing was race, as is often the case in our discussions about reconciliation in the church. As the mother of one Asian and three black children, I'm thankful these conversations are taking place. But when it comes to this sort of reconciliation for people with disabilities, many Christians aren't ready to seek forgiveness, repentance and justice.

Most Christians I know are more knowledgeable about health-care legislation's effects on middle-class families' premiums than on disabled people's ability to live at all.

The impact of governmental actions on those with disabilities shouldn't be heard via stories online but rather stories shared as we pray and break bread together in community. Disability in church should be a commonplace reality, not a surprising hashtag.

 





Championing the unfortunate

We can’t fix all the world’s ills, but we still must try

Houston Chronicle Sunday

28 May 2017

By Rabbi David Lyon

Tazria-Metzora is one of the least favorite portions in the whole Torah, because it’s about bodily emissions, leprosy and other taboo subjects. But, it gets a bum rap.

If we read it as the rabbis did, and we should, the portion urges us to find the sacred and Godly in what is unfamiliar and unseemly. In this portion in Leviticus, scaly skin afflictions, bodily emissions and “tzara’at” — commonly translated to mean leprosy — were examined by the priest.

If the priest deemed a man or woman was “unclean,” then the person would call out, “Unclean, unclean!” and be exempt from the community for a prescribed amount of time. Only until the priest found that the person was “clean” could re-entry be allowed, and with proper gifts and offerings.

The goal wasn’t condemnation or exile; the goal was maintenance of a sacred community that aimed for God’s blessing through ritual and ethical deeds.

Today, it goes without saying that we understand vastly more about such ancient taboos. But, can it also be said that we’ve done as much as our ancient ancestors not to condemn or exile those who, temporarily or permanently, cannot meet the highest standards of human participation? In Texas, our lawmakers are considering cutting the funding of State Supported Living Centers (SSLCs), which service and provide homes to severely mentally disabled children and adults. If the funding is cut, residents will be forced to move to other locations, sometimes farther from parents and relatives who visit regularly. In other cases, there is no family to visit: their parents are unable or unwilling to visit, or they’re deceased. Reducing care means reducing compassion for children and adults who need it most.

About 25 years ago, a young couple I knew who already had a bright baby boy, welcomed a little girl into their lives. But, after some time they recognized that her verbal and motor skills weren’t developing, and her obvious temperamental behavior was growing more severe. Doctors couldn’t diagnose it properly and spiritual support was failing, too. The rabbi of their synagogue — not in Texas — empathized, but offered no real support.

Failing them, the mother, who had chosen Judaism lovingly, nevertheless, sought a church to find what they couldn’t find in the synagogue. The church was better equipped to respond. The mother decided to reclaim her Christian faith, and her husband, not wanting to be left behind, joined her. The child now resides in a state sponsored residential home and always will. Her parents visit regularly and provide unconditional love.

The outcome was good for the family and their daughter, but it left a hole in the Jewish community that desperately needed to be filled with better support, resources and hope. Jay Ruderman, of the Ruderman Family Foundation, teaches, “If you lose the child, you lose the family.”

Similarly, but with a more favorable outcome, a daughter of members of my congregation in Houston, sought the support of their senior rabbi at the time, and found what they needed from the synagogue. Rabbi Karff, Rabbi Emeritus of Congregation Beth Israel, responded generously to their needs with resources, support and hope. Their daughter lives in a residential home in Texas, and receives regular visits from her family and unconditional love, too.

When their daughter was of bat mitzvah age, when a 13 year-old Jewish child is called to read and teach from Torah, she was obviously unable to do it. But, standing near the Holy Ark, Rabbi Karff placed the Torah into their daughter’s arms and guided her in reciting a few sacred words. The rabbi’s blessing confirmed her place in God’s covenant with all God’s children.

The bond between family and synagogue will forever be regarded as a testament to faith and trust. Today, Congregation Beth Israel’s commitment to children and especially those who have specific challenges is one of its many gifts to Jewish families.

If birth is a blessing from God, then we are in no position to judge which births are greater blessings than others. As moral advocates, we must champion the needs of the unfortunate. For the sake of children and adults in State Supported Living Centers, we must oppose consolidating and/or closure of any SSLCs; displacing our most vulnerable and innocent loved ones from their homes and communities.

In Leviticus, the Israelite community, didn’t continue its wilderness journey until every member of the community was able to re-enter. Imagine that the highest and holiest deed was to enable a person to mend and be repaired so that the community could remain intact in God’s presence.

We’re aware that not every citizen can perform their duties as we do; but, every citizen is a human being whose life depends on us. God’s blessing wasn’t meant for the most fit; it was also meant for the most fit to extend it to those who knew they could count on us to do the right thing with it. Our community can’t move on until everybody is counted.

Do give thanks to God for what we know, what we can do and, despite our personal struggles, that we can believe tomorrow will be better; and, then take the time you need to consider those who can’t know or do, or even imagine a better tomorrow for themselves.

It’s not ours to fix all the ills of the world around us, but there’s so much we can do, together, if we advocate for the role that God’s blessings in us were created to serve in others.





Top 10 Mistakes Parents Make in Special Needs Planning

By Ryan Platt

10. Communication is Absent. Never Created a Letter of Intent

It is common that parents and caregivers do not take the time to document their child’s medical history, daily activities, therapists, schools, professionals involved in their child’s life, organizations they are a part of, their child’s favorite things (i.e. music, movies, books, blankets, toys, activities, etc.), behavioral issues, sensitivities, diet and, most importantly, the hopes and dreams for their loved one’s future. You have learned quite a bit about your child and how he or she interacts with the world, and we want to ensure the next caregiver is given a head start so they can provide the best care possible for your child when you are no longer able. 

It is critical that you share your plan with your extended family. It is all too common for parents to do planning in a vacuum. This can be a problem when a well-intended grandparent leaves money for your child. An inheritance or gift could disqualify your child from future government benefits which would result in the loss of hundreds of thousands of dollars of benefits over your child’s lifetime. This event can be avoided by sharing your plan. 

 9. Plan to Use the Disinheritance Model

Is this You? “We will just leave all of our assets to other children or to a family friend and they will see to it that our loved one will receive the proper care.” 

This has been a common planning method that carries unnecessary risk. For instance, when we leave money to another person, that money is now their asset to do with as they wish. They can decide to skimp on care for your loved one and use more of it for themselves. 

Another risk we take with this model is liability. For instance, if the person we leave the money to ends up divorcing in the future, then 50% of the money intended for the care of your loved one can be given to the ex-spouse in the divorce settlement. Another risk can occur if the individual you leave the money to has financial difficulty (bankruptcy) or is named in a lawsuit; then the money you intended for the future needs of your loved one may be wiped out. There is a much better way to protect the needs of your loved one, and it is setting up a special needs trust. 

8. Don’t Have a Special Needs Trust Set Up or It’s Set Up Incorrectly

A Special Needs Trust is a uniquely designed trust for you to leave assets that will provide for your loved one’s future care. By placing them in this unique trust, you will avoid the dangers of the previous mistake. Furthermore, you will protect eligibility for government benefits such as Medicaid and SSI. 

Words of Caution 

 A Special Needs Trust is not a regular trust. You need to consult with a qualified special needs planner and qualified attorney to ensure you have the right type of trust. 

7. Never Defined Future Needs

If you have a GPS system, you know that if you want directions, you must enter your current position as well as a destination. If you never enter a destination, the GPS system can’t help you. The same can be said for your loved one’s future needs. You must first take time to program the GPS, meaning define the future needs of your child (i.e. therapy needs, housing, care-giving environment, monthly expenses, medical needs, employment). Second, pinpoint your destination, meaning define a lifetime cost for your loved one’s needs. In this way, you will know how much money it will take to provide these future needs. 

6. Never Secure Your Own Future

If we imagine your life as a truck rolling down life’s highway, then your child’s life would be represented as the trailer being pulled by the truck. Your child’s future is hitched to your well-being and to your successful future. The future of your child is contingent upon your own. If your truck breaks down, then in essence, so does the trailer. 

As parents, we are always putting our children’s needs before our own and working diligently to create a bright future for them. Your child’s future is only as healthy as your own. As you begin planning for the future of your child, you must also plan for your future. By securing your future, you also help to create a better future for your child. 

5. Never Set Up Your Will or Other Legal Documents

A Will does three important things for you, your family and your loved one. It tells the court system: 

 Where your property goes

 Where your people go (who will be future care-givers) 

 Who will Administer your Will (Executor/Executrix) 

Without a Will the court will make these decisions for you. Your loved one may not receive the assets you would like, or your loved one may receive assets that could result in the loss of eligibility for government benefits. Furthermore, the court can decide where your loved one lives and he or she may not be cared for by those you intended. 

4. Incorrect Beneficiary Designations 

Beneficiary Designations are most notably found on life insurance and retirement plans such as a 401(k), IRA, Roth IRA, pension plan, etc. These are important because the beneficiary designation overrides the sentiments of your will. Make certain to designate the proper primary, secondary and tertiary beneficiaries to ensure your money goes where you intend. 

3. Don't Understand the Tax System

The tax system can be complex to understand for any family; however, it is much more so when you are trying to provide for a lifetime of support for a loved one with special needs after the parents are gone. Special needs trusts are a great tool to use in order to provide for this support. As families plan, however, it is critical to understand the tax implications of different assets when they are held in a special needs trust. You’ll want to work with a qualified professional that can help you begin funding accounts in a way that minimizes taxes and maximizes the amount that is passed on to your loved one. 

2. Never Made Future Care-Giver Official

Either you never chose a future care-giver, or you did choose one but never put it in a will. By placing those directions in your will, it provides the court system guidance regarding the future care-giver. 

This is usually one decision that is very difficult to make; how-ever, a qualified planner should have the tools necessary to help you in making this decision. 

1. You Simply Do Nothing

This is the WORST Mistake of all. Doing nothing will ensure that your child is left to fend for themselves. They will miss out on so many opportunities for a better life if you do nothing for them. 

You maybe petrified, overwhelmed, paralyzed with anxiety and stress to the point where all you do is pretend everything will be ok. But it won’t be unless you take action and take action now. 

If you have made some of these mistakes, don’t worry. There is still time to address them, but you must take action now. If you have made any of those above mistakes and you want to make sure that your child’s future is secure contact your financial professional or attorney.





Across DFW: Assessment of Fair Housing



Cities across North Texas are having public input meetings for their upcoming Assessments of Fair Housing (AFH). The purpose of the AFH is to assess whether individuals and families have the information, opportunity and options to live where they choose without unlawful discrimination related to race, color, religion, sex, familial status, national origin or disability. Your voice is very important to the next generation of people with disabilities to ensure they have safe, affordable housing.

Links: CPSH encourages our community to speak up and complete the survey about the need for affordable, accessible housing throughout the DFW area (Collin, Denton, Dallas, Ellis, Kaufman, Rockwall and Tarrant Counties). CPSH has two messages that can affect many families:
  • There is a the significant gap between Fair Market Rent (set by HUD) and competitive rent in the DFW area. The gap prevents finding affordable rental property using vouchers in safe neighborhoods where people with IDD and autism can live. The reimbursement rate of the voucher is set by the Fair Market Rent. Property owners prefer to rent at competitive rates because they make more profit at competitive rates than at Fair Market Rent. So property owners are less interested in applying to accept vouchers from their residents or applying for Project-Based Vouchers.


  • The DFW area needs Project-Based Voucher programs for single family homes so that property owners who want to lease homes to persons with IDD can do so. This is important because under this program there are agreements between property owners and services providers to help the tenants in the home as needed. The property owner can select the residents to ensure compatibility which is very important for people with disabilities. There are 54 people in the DFW area who are successfully living in apartment units and homes under this program. Through reasonable accommodations adults can live in community-based housing.
Your attendance at these meetings is important to make change happen for these underserved adults. They need opportunity and access to live in the community.

If you plan to attend would you please let us know? Email. Let's go where our voices will be heard!





July 2017 Creating Home News (Archive)

Title of the document
Creating Home News
wordart
Collin, Denton, Dallas, Ellis, Kaufman, Rockwall and Tarrant Counties

COMMUNITY FOR PERMANENT SUPPORTED HOUSING
July 2017

Dallas News CPSH Commentary - IDD/Autism independent living
Recently, there have been several stories in the Dallas Morning News about developments being build for people living with intellectual/developmental disabilities and autism. These are positive initiatives but in total they provide housing for less than 500 residents and the cost is out of reach for most families. More affordable, safe housing options are needed in North Texas.

As an organization that advocates for safe, affordable, service-enriched housing, we want the community to know that there are very affordable ways that individuals with these disabilities may access housing at about 30% of income. It takes work to make this happen.

Please go here to click through to view the story. There is also a link to the detailed story with data and examples.

Already, the story has reached over 3.000 people in North Texas. CPSH would like it to reach at least 5,000 people. If you feel so inclined, please forward the link or this email to others who may be interested in affordable housing and encourage them to contact CPSH.

CPSH has asked to meet with the Dallas Housing Authority to discuss the gap between Fair Market Rent (set by HUD) and competitive rent. The gap creates a challenge finding affordable rental property in safe neighborhoods where people with IDD and autism can live.

Soon, CPSH will host a community meeting to discuss this and other topics.

Thank you for reading and sharing.


Unite4housing: CPSH Complaint to HUD
CPSH has filed a compliant with HUD regarding the Dallas Housing Authority's cancelation of the Project-Based Voucher program for single family homes so that persons with IDD can live in safe, affordable housing in the DFW area.

The HUD investigator has notified us that the investigation is ongoing.

CPSH encourages you to participate in the email campaign to show local housing leaders that you support this complaint. Already 155 people have sent emails.

These vouchers are for Collin, Dallas, Denton, Ellis, Kaufman, Rockwall, and Tarrant Counties.

Anyone, anywhere can send emails.

For the latest information and the email campaign, go here.


QUESTION OF THE MONTH: Would your child thrive in a tiny house?
Each month CPSH will pose a question about housing, so we can understand your thoughts about housing options. You can be anonymous or share your email address.

This is a social movement where people are choosing to downsize the space they live in. The typical American home is around 2,600 square feet, whereas the typical small or tiny house is between 100 and 400 square feet.

Would you please send us your feedback, here?


Have you responded to the New CPSH Survey?
Your response helps CPSH plan for the next 5 years. The survey is here.



Creating Home News and Calendar here

guide

48 pages, Full color, Bound, English, Spanish.
Find out about the guide, here.

Read feedback and order the guide, here. Please share your feedback.

Just $6 per copy!

School Districts, Businesses and Organizations, contact
CPSH about volume printing, here.


           

           

giving
Your Donation Matters!
Help CPSH with 2017 Projects.

CPSH can only succeed with your help. If you appreciate the importance of what we are doing in the DFW area, please consider donating to CPSH.

Learn more about donating at Give2CPSH.
        


Subscribe
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About This Newsletter
The Community for Permanent Supported Housing e-newsletter has stories, calendar of events, and other features about creative housing options for adults with intellectual/developmental disabilities or social challenges, as well as independent living in North Texas.

About CPSH
CPSH is a charity and works with families and community partners to create more housing options in the Collin, Denton, Dallas, Ellis, Kaufman, Rockwall and Tarrant Counties for almost 100,000 adults with intellectual/developmental disabilities or social challenges regardless of IQ who need safe, affordable housing with support. CPSH has created an independent living guide for parents everywhere in Texas.


cpsh 8 Ways to Support CPSH, here.
Watch the CPSH Animated Mission Video, here.
Change your subscription or contact CPSH
© by 2017 Community for Permanent Supported Housing. All rights Reserved.
vision

Minding my disabled daughter: "I don't want to do this any more"

This story is the reality of parents with children who need lots of care.  An example of why housing is so important for people with all type of disabilities.  Send us your story!





6/27/17 SSI and Work Income

Many individuals receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) may want to work but are concerned about the impact of earnings on their SSI and Medicaid benefits. The Social Security Administration provides work incentives that may allow you to keep some or all of your benefits while you work. With good information you can make an informed choice about work.


Listen to this webinar to learn more about: 
• Basics of SSI
• Medicaid overview
• SSI return to work process
• SSI work incentives
• Next steps to return to work





6/29/17 Dallas News CPSH Commentary Affordable housing is possible

To the right  is the link to the Dallas News opinion editorial we had published this week.

Here is the pdf of the story  if you don't have a subscription of to dallas news.com.

If you would like to read the details behind the story go here. (pdf)

7/4/17 update: Recently, there have been several stories in the Dallas Morning News about developments being build for people living with intellectual/developmental disabilities and autism. These are positive initiatives but in total they provide housing for less than 500 residents and the cost is out of reach for most families. More affordable, safe housing options are needed in North Texas. 

As an organization that advocates for safe, affordable, service-enriched housing, we want the community to know that there are very affordable ways that individuals with these disabilities may access housing at about 30% of income. It takes work to make this happen. 

Already, the story has reached over 3.000 people in North Texas. CPSH would like it to reach at least 5,000 people. If you feel so inclined, please forward the link or this email to others who may be interested in affordable housing and encourage them to contact CPSH. 

CPSH has asked to meet with the Dallas Housing Authority to discuss the gap between Fair Market Rent (set by HUD) and competitive rent. The gap creates a challenge finding affordable rental property in safe neighborhoods where people with IDD and autism can live. 

Soon, CPSH will host a community meeting to discuss this and other topics. 

Thank you for reading and sharing. 

 

 

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Unite4housing update-HUD Complaint

unite4housing

June 26, 2017

CPSH has filed a compliant with HUD regarding the Dallas Housing Authority's cancelation of the Project-based voucher program for single family homes so that persons with IDD can live in safe, affordable housing in the DFW area.

The HUD investigator has notified us that the investigation is ongoing.

CPSH encourages you to participate in the email campaign to show local housing leaders that you support this complaint. Already 155 people have sent emails.

These vouchers are for Collin, Dallas, Denton, Ellis, Kaufman, Rockwall, and Tarrant Counties.  

Anyone, anywhere can send emails.

For the latest information and the email campaign, go here 

 

May 28, 2017

CPSH has filed a compliant with HUD regarding the Dallas Housing Authority's cancelation of the Project-based voucher program for single family homes so that persons with IDD can live in safe, affordable housing in the DFW area.

During May, 2017 HUD requested answers to several questions about the complaint, which we provided.  We will post correspondence with HUD on our webpage as we receive it and share news as it happens.

Already over 150 people have sent emails to local elected offices to share with them their support of the complaint. Several people from out of state have found our website and sent letters as well. Thank you to everyone who send emails. 

We encourage you to send your emails and share this issue with family and friends.  

For the latest information and the email campaign, go here 

Thank you for your advocacy for a better North Texas.